5.3.5 Build Knowledge

Building KnowledgeStudents are socialized into their different professions resulting in limited understanding of the knowledge, skills, values and theoretical perspectives of others.  Several authors have identified socialization within professional boundaries as a barrier to collaborative practice (Hanson, Spross, & Carr, 2000; Martin-Rodriguez, Beaulieu, D’Amour, & Ferrada-Videla, 2005; Reese & Sontag, 2001).  A focus of interprofessional education within your agency should be the encouragement of integration of knowledge and expertise of students from different disciplines through a variety of learning activities that develop skills in collective decision-making. The following three modules, collective decision-making,analytical questioning and critical thinking, although common to all professions, are designed to highlight the key competencies essential for promoting collaborative values and an awareness of how to share knowledge and expertise. 

Collective Decision-Making

Develop an ability to engage in collective decision-making as a team member.

icon Points to Remember to Guide Learning (PDF)
icon Learning Strategies (PDF)
icon Indicators of Success: Ability to Build Knowledge as a Team (PDF)

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Analytical Questioning

Formulate clinical questions that direct searching of the literature for relevant and precise answers.

Ask questions of preceptors and those of other team members in a way that demonstrates an understanding of interprofessional clinical issues.

Ask questions related to the clinical work and role development as a health care provider and as a team member.

icon Points to Remember to Guide Learning (PDF)
icon Learning Strategies (PDF)
icon Indicators of Success: Ability to Ask and Answer Questions (PDF)

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Collective Capability

The complexity of care creates challenges for the team. Providers are required to seek the deeper issues that endanger the health of individuals; allow the right combination of therapies/ treatments to come together for healing; accept the broader determinants of health and the multifaceted nature of solutions; participate in partnerships and integrated care based on shared decision-making; and accept the uniqueness of providers, as well as competencies that are shared (Patterson, 2000).  Within this type of environment, providers must organize knowledge and adjust their practices as individuals and as team members.

Soubhi et al. (2009) introduced the idea of collective capability. Capability was defined as “a dynamic balance between knowing and doing; appraising and interpreting what is unfolding at any given moment and responding appropriately; recognizing the right thing to do and doing it at the right time with the right resources “(Soubhi et al., 2009, p.3).  Collective capability is then the ability of providers’ to establish the balance between organizing what they know and do as they adjust to the complexity of patients’ needs. Critical thinking is essential to this process in that it allows providers to look beyond the obvious and question, examine thinking, explore new ways of doing things and optimize decision-making.

icon Points to Remember to Guide Learning (PDF)
icon Learning Strategies (PDF)
icon Indicators of Success: Development of Critical Thinking Skills (PDF)

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Key Challenges

Acknowledgements

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